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With ‘all out’ elections to Wyre Forest District Council only six months away now is the time to take action if you are interested in becoming a councillor.

Drop in to Kidderminster Town Hall on Tuesday 9 December 2014 between 12.30 – 2.30pm to find out how you can make a difference to the quality of people’s lives in Wyre Forest.

More people from all walks of life are being encouraged to consider becoming a councillor.

There are around 20,000 local councillors in England, each representing their local community and each with their own reason for doing so. Councils are particularly keen to encourage people from under-represented groups to get involved, such as younger people, people from England’s many ethnic communities and disabled people. Women are also under-represented on local councils.

Councillors are elected to the local council to represent their local community, so they must either live or work in the area. Becoming a councillor is both a rewarding and privileged form of public service. You will be in a position to make a difference to the quality of other people’s daily lives and prospects. Councillors have to balance the needs and interests of residents, the political party they represent (if any) and the council.

Ian Miller, Returning Officer for Wyre Forest, said:

“In May 2015 the number of councillors on Wyre Forest District Council will reduce from 42 to 33.  In October the new wards and the number of councillors there will be in each ward were announced by the Local Government Boundary Commission for England, who drew up the new arrangements.  If you are not already a councillor and are thinking of standing as a candidate, the event on 9 December will give you the opportunity to find out more about what is involved. We will be organising a further event in the New Year for anyone who can’t manage to come along on 9 December.”

For information about becoming a councillor in the Wyre Forest district, visit the council’s ‘becoming a councillor’ web pages. While formal meetings are only part of the work that councillors do, most meetings of councils and their committees are open to the public so you can come and see what is involved. The District Council broadcasts many of its meetings live on the internet, including the Planning Committee on 9 December, Council on 10 December and Cabinet on 16 December. It is also possible to view the webcasts at a time that suits you, as they are available for 6 months after the meeting on the Council’s website.

For general information about what a councillor does and the skills that you may need, visit the Be A Councillor website.




Wyre Forest District Council